News

Random Tree Fun

20 July, 2009

We just added a section to our website called Random Tree Fun where you can explore amazing tree photos, listen to music made from a tree, and read tree related blogs and more.
Arbor-Sculpture

Arbor Sculpture

589 Trees Planted in Huron-Manistee

07 July, 2009

Kirtland-Warbler

Kirtland's Warbler

Our Tree Gift trees given  between May and November 2008 were Jack pine trees and were  just planted in Huron-Manistee National Forest in Michigan.

Huron-Manistee National Forest is home to an endangered bird, the Kirtland’s warbler. This bird’s habitat is a very small area, and it requires young Jack pines trees to nest under.

This group of our trees will not only help restore Huron-Manistee National Forest, but as a bonus will also provide a much needed space for this endangered little bird–it’s like a 2 for 1 bonus!

578 Trees Planted in Plumas National Forest

17 June, 2009

Plumas-National-Forest
Our Tree Gift trees given between December 2008 and March 2009 were just planted last month in Plumas National Forest in Northern California.
 
The trees were Ponderosa pine, Sugar pine, Jeffrey pine, Douglas fir, Incense cedar,  White fir, and Red fir, and were planted to restore 22,000 acres of forest devastated by the Antelope Complex  fire of 2007.
 
See Forest Service MAP
See Forest Service PHOTOS
At 100 years old, the average of these trees  will be 96 feet tall and 18 inches is diameter, and will provide food and shelter for several species of animals and birds.
 
Please check our our website later this summer for more photos.

Now You Can Find Your Tree

07 April, 2009

We’ve added a Find Your Tree  feature to our website,  so now you and your Tree Gift recipient can find out where their tree was or will be planted. 
 
Our trees are usually planted in the late spring or early summer, and we’ll have photos of each year’s planting up by the following fall.
 
In addition to photos and  
information about where 
your tree was planted, we also offer links to  information about the particular forest and the fire that destroyed it.

A New Fundraising Program

28 February, 2009

Now schools and groups can raise funds by selling our Tree Gift Cards. Benefits include:
fundraiser-program
  • Helping the earth whilehelping your group
  • 40% Profit
  • No upfront $ is required
  • Tree Gift Cards are an affordable $15 each
  • Low minimum of 50 cards
  • Quick turn around
  • 100% recycled paper cards and supplies
  • FREE shipping and no hidden fees

A Milestone

10 December, 2008

In November we received an order to plant our 1000th tree. 
This means we have replanted devastated forest land equivalent to two football fields  in size since our opening in July of 2007.
We have made only a small dent in the million acres of National Forest land that is desperate for reforestation, but it is significant, especially to the trees and animals that now live there.
Thank you for your continued support of Trees for a Change.  When you choose to give a Tree Gift, you really are making a difference.

A Visit to Our First 600 Trees

17 September, 2008

In August 2008 we traveled to Montana to visit the 600 Douglas Fir trees planted for us in July in Gallatin National Forest.

We knew the Derby Fire had destroyed 249,000 acres of Gallatin in 2006, but nothing really could have prepared us for what we saw.
tree-baby-for-web
It is hard to describe the eerie sensation of  isolation,  of utter quiet and hopelessness you feel when surrounded by miles of tree skeltons.
  
Happily, after a 20 mile drive down a dirt road, we found the seedlings thriving, having been planted very carefully by the Forest Service.  The seedlings were between 10 and 16 inches tall, had a space of 18″ around them cleared of competing vegetation, and a log set on one side to provide the growing trunk with partial shade.
 
The trip was overwhelming, emotional, and uplifting.  Now more than ever we are excited to be planting trees and helping restore areas in desperate need of reforestation like Gallatin.
 
Since Douglas Fir trees typically do not regenerate themselves after a fire,  without help Gallatin National Forest would have stayed a dry, lifeless,  desolate area for years come.  But now, with your help, there is new life.
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